Tag Archives: 123D Design

Notes from Day 3 of #Construct3D — can’t wait for the next event! #MakerEd #STEMed #STEAM

Keynote, Sallye Coyle of Shopbot shared the story of the company – primarily her husband wanted/needed a tool to help him build a boat, and initially they intended to sell to garage hobbyists. As it turned out, they now help Boeing, NASA, communities, machine shops, schools, and self-employed folks design and manufacture parts.

Darlene Farris-LaBar‘s session, Empowering Creative Minds with 3D Printing for Art & Designincluding gorgeous examples of her art and inspirations. She is a co-founder of East Stroudsburg University’s G3D Super Lab. She shared many lovely examples of pieces printed with a Stratasys full color, multi-material 3D printer – they are just awe-inspiring.

Next, Jennifer Grayburn and Veronica Ikeshoji-Orlati led a session, Remaking the Past: Teaching Art History and Material Culture Through 3D Printing. They talked about having students locate, analyze, and print monuments and other works of art and how the process is most important (similar to what Corinne shared yesterday).

My friend, Ian Klapper of City and Country School, led a session on Visualizing the Past Into the Present and Future. He talked about the constraints of space in a NYC independent school located in Greenwich Village causing him to integrate and bring things into the classroom rather than have the luxury of a designated “Makerspace” — I too am very familiar with this workaround. At C&C, 3D printing is primarily done in Grades 5 and 6, but Ian has been working with teachers to 3D print with younger students too. He shared projects including Viking chess pieces, Medieval wax seals, Mesopotamia cylinder seals, Islamic clay tiles, Renaissance architecture, game pieces, Lenape legends, and moveable type for C&C’s printing press. Three more resources shared at Ian’s session: Thingiverse’s Universal Connectors KitReflow recycled filament, and Mcor ARKe 3D printer which uses paper rather than plastic to form models.

And finally, the last session I attended was an energetic and remarkable share by Chris Sweeney entitled, 3D Printing and Digital Fabrication in the Design Classroom. Chris shared tons of tips, ideas, and photos of student projects including TurtleArt, MakeMakey cardboard instruments, Community Chess pieces, prosthetic tools for a student with cerebral palsy, and more. He also mentioned algae filament, Trnio (a phone scanning app), and using rock tumblers to smooth and polish 3D prints. Chris’s slides from the session are here: https://schd.ws/hosted_files/construct3d2017/db/3D%20Printing%20and%20Digital%20Fabrication%20in%20the%20Design%20Classroom.pdf

After Chris’s session, I caught the last two minutes of Exploring 3D Design Software and Best Practices consisting of panelists Matthew Borgatti, Sean Charlesworth, Michael Curry, Darlene Farris-LaBar, Eric Schimelpfenig, and Laura Taalman and moderated by Matt Griffin of Ultimaker.

Because I can’t remember things like I used to, here are some links from Sarah O’Rourke King, Consumer Youth Marketing Manager at Autodesk, of sites and people I want to follow up on:

Finally, the ever-inspiring Corinne Takara suggested getting ideas and motivation from these sources:

Corinne also honored me with one of her mycelium lights – she even gave it to me in a plastic corsage box! I told her I would absolutely go to prom with her — luckily she laughed. 🙂

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Grade 6 designing LEGOS with @Autodesk123D in math with @KKleinNYC. #mathchat #STEAM

Katie Klein (@KKleinNYC) and Jazmin Sherwood’s 6th grade math students are designing LEGOS in this third or fourth iteration of a project that we prototype and revamp each year. In the past, we’ve used a class account on Tinkercad to construct our 3-D shape, and this year students are working with Autodesk’s 123D Design (@Autodesk123D). Tinkercad is part of Autodesk’s 123D family of free apps for 3D scanning, designing, and slicing  apps and software.

In our math project, students solve for the surface area and volume of a one-bump LEGO. Time allowing, they also engineer either a larger traditionally shaped LEGO brick or design a LEGO that isn’t part of a set yet. We are ever grateful to Jeremy Sambuca of The Hewitt School for opening my eyes to this project years ago during a presentation at the now-closed Makerbot store in SoHo.

Here’s the updated lesson plan Katie shared with the children today:

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Notes and pics from @LeSheepo’s 2D to 3D designing and laser cutting class at @beamcenternyc. #MakerEd

The Beam Center is an awesome makerspace and learning center in Red Hook, Brooklyn. They have tons of equipment and tools and offer free and inexpensive programming for students, families, and educators. Last night I attended a free workshop led by the incredible Nancy Otero (@LeSheepo), Laser Cutter: 2D to 3D.

Here are some of the great things I learned:

  1. Jennifer Jacobs (@jsquare) build a Codeable Objects library in Processing that is an amazing design tool for creating laser-cut lamps. http://highlowtech.org/?p=2675 (Check out her other awesome MIT research projects here.)
  2. Eric Rosenblum (@ericrosenbizzle), co-designer of the MakeyMakey, has shared many awesome #MakerEd gifts with the world including Beetle Blocks visual code for designing in 3D (which is like Scratch for 3D printing)! http://beetleblocks.com
  3. Maureen Reilly (@MaureenrReilly), an incredible teacher and maker and STEAM coordinator, told me about the @OZOBOT which is a tiny line-sensing robot. http://www.ozobot.com
  4. We used Autodesk’s 123D Make to import an .STL file of a 3D model. 123D Make creates 2D build plans with animated assembly instructions and quickly (and easily!) lets you choose a construction technique (stacked slices, interlocking slices, etc.) Here’s a tutorial via @Instructableshttp://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-Slice-Up-a-T-Rex-in-123D-Make/?ALLSTEPS
  5. Nancy helped me with all the nutty settings required to laser cut .25″ cardboard on the Epilog Mini 24 Laser which has a large work area (24″ x 12″) that holds most standard engraving stock material.

After the class, I stopped by Brooklyn Famacy & Soda Fountain for a mint chocolate chip hot fudge sundae. I needed both hands free to gorge, so I had  to leave my laser-cut cardboard cat bust behind. True.

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Integrated activities for grades K-5 from my classes at @MarymountNYC’s #STEAM camp. #edtech #MakerEd

Screen Shot 2015-07-31 at 11.34.07 AMFrom June 22 – July 24, I led technology projects at Marymount’s Summer STEAM Camp in the awesome FabLab Makerspace at their 5th Avenue campus. It was quite an experience to gather, develop, and run projects for campers with varying skill sets in grades K-5 for five weeks. Also, each grade level had a different and unique theme almost every week, and I challenged myself to plan integrated projects that correlated with their themes.

Thankfully, I regularly attend lots of professional development events including meetings, workshops, and conferences. Plus, I have a pretty big network of people generously willing to share ideas, so the hardest part was to research different options for each week’s topic and narrow down the choices. Blessedly, Nancy Otero (@LeSheepo) was there for the final week of camp to help with crafting automata and laser cutting gears. She’s an amazingly gifted engineer and design thinker who also leads wonderful learning opportunities at The Beam Center (@beamcenterNYC) in Brooklyn and beyond.

I created a GoogleSite of resources and topics which I shared with teachers and parents for the summer. Below is a summary of topics covered, and here is a link to the full site: https://sites.google.com/site/mmtsteamcamp2015

** Inventors and Explorers 1 and Inventors and Explorers 2 **

IE1 and IE2 in grades K-1 were the youngest campers I worked with. They met the least frequently for one or two 45-minute sessions per week. I had a set of iPads available, so after some brief instructions and examples, kids worked independently or in pairs to explore a variety of coding, building, and learning apps including KodableHopscotchScratch Jr.BlokifyTinkerplay, and PrintShop.

** STEAM 1 and STEAM 2 **

STEAM1 campers were in grades 1-2, and STEAM2 campers were in grades 3-4. I saw them for a combined 6 or 7 hours or so during the week in 45-minute and 90-minute blocks to explore:
— Stop-motion videos with the Stop Motion Studio iPad app
— Paper circuits with great instructions from @Exploratorium
— The Toontastic iPad app
— 3D printing with the MakerBot PrintShop and Cubify iPad apps
— MakeyMakey pianos, LED light up plush toys with a sewn-in battery pocket
— Cardboard automata with laser-cut gears and 3-D printed bearings with another set of great instructions from the Exploratorium: http://www.exploratorium.edu/pie/downloads/Cardboard_Automata.pdf

** STEAM 3 **

STEAM3 campers were in grades 5 and met for about 5 hours a week in 45-minute and 90-minute blocks. Topics explored included:
— DNA with origami and by making LED cuff bracelets where kids’ initials correlated with the color schemes of amino acids
— MakeyMakey pianos and other instruments made with cardboard, conductive materials, and Scratch programming
— Rube Goldberg machines with materials found all over the lab (I showed them Audri’s viral enthusiastic video and OK Go’s This Too Shall Pass music video for inspiration — see below)
— 3D printing with the MakerBot PrintShopCubify123D Design, and Morphi iPad apps
— Making interactive endangered animal maze games using Scratch programming environment
Cardboard automata with laser-cut gears and 3-D printed bearings with great instructions from the Exploratorium

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