Tag Archives: 3D printing

Notes from Day 3 of #Construct3D — can’t wait for the next event! #MakerEd #STEMed #STEAM

Keynote, Sallye Coyle of Shopbot shared the story of the company – primarily her husband wanted/needed a tool to help him build a boat, and initially they intended to sell to garage hobbyists. As it turned out, they now help Boeing, NASA, communities, machine shops, schools, and self-employed folks design and manufacture parts.

Darlene Farris-LaBar‘s session, Empowering Creative Minds with 3D Printing for Art & Designincluding gorgeous examples of her art and inspirations. She is a co-founder of East Stroudsburg University’s G3D Super Lab. She shared many lovely examples of pieces printed with a Stratasys full color, multi-material 3D printer – they are just awe-inspiring.

Next, Jennifer Grayburn and Veronica Ikeshoji-Orlati led a session, Remaking the Past: Teaching Art History and Material Culture Through 3D Printing. They talked about having students locate, analyze, and print monuments and other works of art and how the process is most important (similar to what Corinne shared yesterday).

My friend, Ian Klapper of City and Country School, led a session on Visualizing the Past Into the Present and Future. He talked about the constraints of space in a NYC independent school located in Greenwich Village causing him to integrate and bring things into the classroom rather than have the luxury of a designated “Makerspace” — I too am very familiar with this workaround. At C&C, 3D printing is primarily done in Grades 5 and 6, but Ian has been working with teachers to 3D print with younger students too. He shared projects including Viking chess pieces, Medieval wax seals, Mesopotamia cylinder seals, Islamic clay tiles, Renaissance architecture, game pieces, Lenape legends, and moveable type for C&C’s printing press. Three more resources shared at Ian’s session: Thingiverse’s Universal Connectors KitReflow recycled filament, and Mcor ARKe 3D printer which uses paper rather than plastic to form models.

And finally, the last session I attended was an energetic and remarkable share by Chris Sweeney entitled, 3D Printing and Digital Fabrication in the Design Classroom. Chris shared tons of tips, ideas, and photos of student projects including TurtleArt, MakeMakey cardboard instruments, Community Chess pieces, prosthetic tools for a student with cerebral palsy, and more. He also mentioned algae filament, Trnio (a phone scanning app), and using rock tumblers to smooth and polish 3D prints. Chris’s slides from the session are here: https://schd.ws/hosted_files/construct3d2017/db/3D%20Printing%20and%20Digital%20Fabrication%20in%20the%20Design%20Classroom.pdf

After Chris’s session, I caught the last two minutes of Exploring 3D Design Software and Best Practices consisting of panelists Matthew Borgatti, Sean Charlesworth, Michael Curry, Darlene Farris-LaBar, Eric Schimelpfenig, and Laura Taalman and moderated by Matt Griffin of Ultimaker.

Because I can’t remember things like I used to, here are some links from Sarah O’Rourke King, Consumer Youth Marketing Manager at Autodesk, of sites and people I want to follow up on:

Finally, the ever-inspiring Corinne Takara suggested getting ideas and motivation from these sources:

Corinne also honored me with one of her mycelium lights – she even gave it to me in a plastic corsage box! I told her I would absolutely go to prom with her — luckily she laughed. 🙂

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Notes from Day 2 of #Construct3D hosted by @DukeU. #MakerEd #STEMed #STEAM

I am thoroughly enjoying this inaugural #Construct3D conference, and I hope to return for additional annual events to follow! Today offered a great lineup of sessions for teachers, makers, K-12 (elementary, middle, and upper), college, grad school, STEM, STEAM, low tech, high tech, formal ed (schools), informal ed (libraries, afterschool programs), software, hardware, and more. Day 2 including another jam-packed schedule of speakers and workshops. See the full line-up here: https://construct3d2017.sched.com/

This morning’s keynote was delivered by Skylar Tibbits of MIT’s Self-Assembly Lab! He shared many awesome futuristic projects with smart materials that he and/or the lab have designed/created/explored including:
1. Fluid assembly furniture
2. 4D printing explorations (materials changes over time – just like Slaughterhouse Five)
3. Programmable materials
4. Aerial assemblies of weather balloons
5. Auxetic materials
6. Rapid liquid printing
7. Rock printing
Skylar’s last slide stated, “Today we program computers and machines. Tomorrow we will program matter itself.”

Following the keynote, I remained in the ballroom for Eric Schimelpfenig‘s session entitled, My Making Journey. Eric described himself as a lackluster student who nevertheless amassed an impressive repertoire of skills which he now puts to use as a digital designer and fabricator. Eric’s website is full of his work and passion projects. Here’s a time-lapse video of Eric assembly the foosball table he designed in Sketchup…

Next, I went downstairs towards Tim Pelton’s Whittling, Learning and Engaging with 3D Printing in Elementary School. Among much other information delivered, Tim shared the story of Austin’s Butterfly and how it evolved via critique & multiple drafts. https://vimeo.com/38247060

I headed next door to play with Sharri Duncan, Joanna McCumber, and a whole lot of 3D pens and filament in their 3D Drawing at Our Fingertips session. Their slides are here: https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1u6zAkjwMRpgBeP6hXBJ4wVCPfuKFCg7PjVn8y5R0_gY/edit#slide=id.g35f391192_00

Following this, I attended Using 3D Printed Surfaces in an Inquiry Style Multivariable Calculus Course with Michael Gagliardo. Back in my  days, I used  in Multivariable Calculus to design 3D digital models of graphs that we could then view on a 2D computer screen. Nowadays, it’s a simple matter to print these graphs in various materials and hold them in your hands. The future is awesome!

After this was a great talk by Tom Burtonwood about his work, Beyond the Inflection Point – Lessons Learned from 3D Printing at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Tom’s notes from the session are here. Also, he has an assortment of his projects on his website here: http://tomburtonwood.com/

Then I stopped by Josh Burker‘s session, Bits From Atoms: Logo and FabricationBits From Atoms: Logo and Fabrication. I’m a huge fan of Josh and his inspiring personal and school projects. His resources from today’s workshop can be found here: http://joshburker.pbworks.com/w/page/117371211/Bits%20to%20Atoms%3A%20Logo%20and%20Fabrication%20-%20Construct3DIMG_5655

I then headed over to a much-anticipated talk from Corinne TakaraCAD Design and 3D Printing as Community and Culture Building Tools. I was made aware of Corinne’s inspirational work through many tweets I saw retweeted by other Maker Educators who I follow. Meeting her in person was a thrill! Among many incredible projects, Corinne shared about her work with a mobile maker cart in Japantown, San Jose, where she had visitors design and create netsuke (obi ornaments traditionally worn by men), a project getting people to design personalized skulls (calaveras) celebrating the life of  a deceased loved one for Dia de Los Muertos, and her mycelium chandelier project. Check out Corinne’s glorious work on her site: http://www.okadadesign.com/ The slides from her impressive session are here: https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1_RQS03QhVxXLbjYOfTBfD9YGM3fHH000dGNrmI2QgJw/mobilepresent?slide=id.p

I’m bummed I missed Justin Riley‘s session, It’s Turtle Graphics All The Way Down. We chatted later, and he helped me compare and contrast BeetleBlocks and BlocksCAD. Based on his extensive knowledge and experience using BeetleBlocks with middle schoolers, I agree that it’s a more age-appropriate tool. Also, here is a link to his session’s slides: https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1XfZSRYLQlUH8zVlFyAA8mkdptH8sHRW-EVsWWesegOU/pub?start=false&loop=false&delayms=3000&slide=id.phttps://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1XfZSRYLQlUH8zVlFyAA8mkdptH8sHRW-EVsWWesegOU/pub?start=false&loop=false&delayms=3000&slide=id.p

Next up was a session by Mark PeetersOpenSCAD Makes Coding, Math and 3D Printing Accessible to Elementary Students. His resources are in a Google Drive Folder here: tinyurl.com/kxseykr Mark shared a mindblowingly simple trick for folding paper to represent a 3D axis! The PDF of his template is in his resources folder.

I then went upstairs to hear from the inimitable Tim Cooper about Creating a 3D Printing Culture in Your School. Among other projects, Tim shared that since his students wear uniforms, some of them 3D designed and printed tie-clips and bowties for themselves and the community.

At this point, I rushed out to a hallway to join Melda Yildiz‘s SpeedTECH Conference at New York Institute of Technology (via Zoom video conferencing) and gush about edcamp for 5 minutes. It’s kinda remarkable to me that I remembered AND made it on time. Yay!

After this escalation to my heart rate, I popped in on Anna Engelke session, Outside the Box: Teaching 3D Printing with Low-Tech STEM Activities. I love a balance between high-tech and low-tech, and Anna had a few stations to explore different ways to address possible limitations with time, tools, and other resources. One table had to keep a pen upright at the center of a “wheel” of strings held by each participant, They were tasked with writing on a piece of paper as a collaborative effort. Such a great team building activity!

After this, I stopped by 3D Printing in the Art Room with Wendy Aracich. Wendy shared awesome student projects for elementary, middle, and upper schoolers using Tinkercad, Inkscape, Blender, and Sculptris. She also shared slides of thought-provoking artists and works to inspire her students. Wendy shared her slides: https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/11DFNQ3ow3SVXa7J7irKg8TcR08t3eEPm-4pEa4G-ua8/edit#slide=id.g35f391192_00

Finally, it was time for dinner and pre-dinner PechaKucha talks — 20 images, 20 seconds per image, no clickers. We were lucky to hear from the following great minds:

There was a lovely gift to attendees flickering around the lobby and dining areas: Holey Cylinder 3D printing votive candles designed by Christopher Hanusa, aka Math Art Shop, and printed at Duke’s CoLab Studio…

And now, after a 16-hour day of learning, sharing, and networking, I’m officially tired and closing my laptop for the night.

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Pics from Day 1 of #Construct3D and @DukeU’s @InnovionCoLab Studio. #MakerEd #STEMed #STEAM

I’m at Duke University for the inaugural Construct3D conference sponsored by Duke, Ultimaker, Autodesk, and ShopBot! Many thanks to co-organizer, Liz Arum, for encouraging me to attend. Below is the description from their website:

Construct3D 2017 is a national conference on digital fabrication focused on “3D printing” for higher education,  K-12, and community education. Join us as we explore ways to foster student engagement, support research, and improve understanding using 21st century technology.

Construct3D 2017 aims to bring together educators from a broad range of educational contexts to exchange ideas and innovation — to accelerate adoption and exploration of 3D printingConstruct3D offers educational pioneers opportunities to shape the implementation of 3D printing in education in years to come.

After a walk and a biscuits and gravy lunch with Ian Klapper of City and Country School, we made our way to Duke’s Technology Engagement Center for workshops and a tour of the Innovation Co-Lab Studio by its director, Chip Bobbert. Photos of the Co-Lab‘s awesome space for digital fabrication are posted below. Check out the mesmerizing wall of Ultimaker printers as well as laser cutters, CNC mills, 3D jet printers, a vending machine of engineering tools, and other tools that make me happy including a vinyl cutter and sewing machine.

 

 

Pics from the opening reception with a keynote from Dale Dougherty of Make Magazine and early glimpses of the vendor tables are below:


Some videos from educator projects highlighted at Ultimaker’s table are below:​


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Pics from my lunch and walk with Ian are below:

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