Tag Archives: Corinne Takara

Photos and notes from Day 1 of #FabLearn #NYC hosted at @TeachersCollege this past weekend. #MakerEd #edtech #elemaker #ArtEdTech

What a thrill to finally attend a FabLearn conference! While there have been other global events, the mostly annual USA gatherings have always been held at Stanford University in California during the fall — never an auspicious time for me since the beginning of the school year is pretty intense.

Paolo Blikstein, co-founder of FabLearn, migrated from Stanford to Teachers College, Columbia University this year, so the event was hosted in my backyard! Friday night, there was an informal gathering of attendees and presenters; It was great to reunite with friends and former colleagues and get introduced to folks who are makers, coders, community builders, and influencers from all over the world.

Day 1 of FabLearn

FabLearn 2019 began on Saturday with a full line-up. (Here is the program of events: https://nyc2019.fablearn.org/program/) The day began with an awesome keynote by the inimitable Sylvia Martinez, “Making the Future: The Future of Making” — her bio and a blurb about keynote can be found here: https://nyc2019.fablearn.org/speakers)

Next up on the program was a panel, “Making without destroying the planet: is it possible?” full of awesome women including Christa Flores and Corinne Okada Takara.

After the panel, the Short Paper authors and Young Maker posters presenters took the stage to give a brief description of their presentations. I loved seeing Nancy Otero (FABulous human and co-founder of the Portfolio School) support her small students as they presented first in a really long line-up of first-time and seasoned showcasers.

Following the poster session, there was a Young Maker Panel moderated by Sean Justice. I was totally inspired by Corinne’s daughter and friends who formed The Living Leather Project! After their presentation (and Corinne’s awesome work), I too want to make/explore kombucha leather and grow/use mycelium with the girls here at The Brearley School!

There were two more panels of , Full Paper presenters, Full Papers A: Building content knowledge through making and Full Papers B: Teaching and mentorship in maker contexts. Following these presentations was the first workshop opportunity. I wish I could have attended all the Saturday workshops! As I could only pick one, I chose, Making with Machine Learning led by Devin Dillon and Rebecca Anderson of Curiosity Machine. Here’s a blurb from the program about the workshop:

ABSTRACT: Learn about making with AI in this interactive session. This session is geared to educators and leaders working with students from 3rd-8th grades or working with family groups. In the workshop, you will uncover some basic machine learning processes as you build an AI model to explore how machine learning systems use data to make decisions, and will consider how you would modify or apply your experiences with your students or groups. We’ll be using Machine Learning for Kids and Scratch to create a bot that reacts to new situations you introduce.

Following the workshop was an Artificial Intelligence (AI) meetup hosted by Nancy Otero and Stefania Druga.

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Notes from Day 2 of #Construct3D hosted by @DukeU. #MakerEd #STEMed #STEAM

I am thoroughly enjoying this inaugural #Construct3D conference, and I hope to return for additional annual events to follow! Today offered a great lineup of sessions for teachers, makers, K-12 (elementary, middle, and upper), college, grad school, STEM, STEAM, low tech, high tech, formal ed (schools), informal ed (libraries, afterschool programs), software, hardware, and more. Day 2 including another jam-packed schedule of speakers and workshops. See the full line-up here: https://construct3d2017.sched.com/

This morning’s keynote was delivered by Skylar Tibbits of MIT’s Self-Assembly Lab! He shared many awesome futuristic projects with smart materials that he and/or the lab have designed/created/explored including:
1. Fluid assembly furniture
2. 4D printing explorations (materials changes over time – just like Slaughterhouse Five)
3. Programmable materials
4. Aerial assemblies of weather balloons
5. Auxetic materials
6. Rapid liquid printing
7. Rock printing
Skylar’s last slide stated, “Today we program computers and machines. Tomorrow we will program matter itself.”

Following the keynote, I remained in the ballroom for Eric Schimelpfenig‘s session entitled, My Making Journey. Eric described himself as a lackluster student who nevertheless amassed an impressive repertoire of skills which he now puts to use as a digital designer and fabricator. Eric’s website is full of his work and passion projects. Here’s a time-lapse video of Eric assembly the foosball table he designed in Sketchup…

Next, I went downstairs towards Tim Pelton’s Whittling, Learning and Engaging with 3D Printing in Elementary School. Among much other information delivered, Tim shared the story of Austin’s Butterfly and how it evolved via critique & multiple drafts. https://vimeo.com/38247060

I headed next door to play with Sharri Duncan, Joanna McCumber, and a whole lot of 3D pens and filament in their 3D Drawing at Our Fingertips session. Their slides are here: https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1u6zAkjwMRpgBeP6hXBJ4wVCPfuKFCg7PjVn8y5R0_gY/edit#slide=id.g35f391192_00

Following this, I attended Using 3D Printed Surfaces in an Inquiry Style Multivariable Calculus Course with Michael Gagliardo. Back in my  days, I used  in Multivariable Calculus to design 3D digital models of graphs that we could then view on a 2D computer screen. Nowadays, it’s a simple matter to print these graphs in various materials and hold them in your hands. The future is awesome!

After this was a great talk by Tom Burtonwood about his work, Beyond the Inflection Point – Lessons Learned from 3D Printing at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Tom’s notes from the session are here. Also, he has an assortment of his projects on his website here: http://tomburtonwood.com/

Then I stopped by Josh Burker‘s session, Bits From Atoms: Logo and FabricationBits From Atoms: Logo and Fabrication. I’m a huge fan of Josh and his inspiring personal and school projects. His resources from today’s workshop can be found here: http://joshburker.pbworks.com/w/page/117371211/Bits%20to%20Atoms%3A%20Logo%20and%20Fabrication%20-%20Construct3DIMG_5655

I then headed over to a much-anticipated talk from Corinne TakaraCAD Design and 3D Printing as Community and Culture Building Tools. I was made aware of Corinne’s inspirational work through many tweets I saw retweeted by other Maker Educators who I follow. Meeting her in person was a thrill! Among many incredible projects, Corinne shared about her work with a mobile maker cart in Japantown, San Jose, where she had visitors design and create netsuke (obi ornaments traditionally worn by men), a project getting people to design personalized skulls (calaveras) celebrating the life of  a deceased loved one for Dia de Los Muertos, and her mycelium chandelier project. Check out Corinne’s glorious work on her site: http://www.okadadesign.com/ The slides from her impressive session are here: https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1_RQS03QhVxXLbjYOfTBfD9YGM3fHH000dGNrmI2QgJw/mobilepresent?slide=id.p

I’m bummed I missed Justin Riley‘s session, It’s Turtle Graphics All The Way Down. We chatted later, and he helped me compare and contrast BeetleBlocks and BlocksCAD. Based on his extensive knowledge and experience using BeetleBlocks with middle schoolers, I agree that it’s a more age-appropriate tool. Also, here is a link to his session’s slides: https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1XfZSRYLQlUH8zVlFyAA8mkdptH8sHRW-EVsWWesegOU/pub?start=false&loop=false&delayms=3000&slide=id.phttps://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1XfZSRYLQlUH8zVlFyAA8mkdptH8sHRW-EVsWWesegOU/pub?start=false&loop=false&delayms=3000&slide=id.p

Next up was a session by Mark PeetersOpenSCAD Makes Coding, Math and 3D Printing Accessible to Elementary Students. His resources are in a Google Drive Folder here: tinyurl.com/kxseykr Mark shared a mindblowingly simple trick for folding paper to represent a 3D axis! The PDF of his template is in his resources folder.

I then went upstairs to hear from the inimitable Tim Cooper about Creating a 3D Printing Culture in Your School. Among other projects, Tim shared that since his students wear uniforms, some of them 3D designed and printed tie-clips and bowties for themselves and the community.

At this point, I rushed out to a hallway to join Melda Yildiz‘s SpeedTECH Conference at New York Institute of Technology (via Zoom video conferencing) and gush about edcamp for 5 minutes. It’s kinda remarkable to me that I remembered AND made it on time. Yay!

After this escalation to my heart rate, I popped in on Anna Engelke session, Outside the Box: Teaching 3D Printing with Low-Tech STEM Activities. I love a balance between high-tech and low-tech, and Anna had a few stations to explore different ways to address possible limitations with time, tools, and other resources. One table had to keep a pen upright at the center of a “wheel” of strings held by each participant, They were tasked with writing on a piece of paper as a collaborative effort. Such a great team building activity!

After this, I stopped by 3D Printing in the Art Room with Wendy Aracich. Wendy shared awesome student projects for elementary, middle, and upper schoolers using Tinkercad, Inkscape, Blender, and Sculptris. She also shared slides of thought-provoking artists and works to inspire her students. Wendy shared her slides: https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/11DFNQ3ow3SVXa7J7irKg8TcR08t3eEPm-4pEa4G-ua8/edit#slide=id.g35f391192_00

Finally, it was time for dinner and pre-dinner PechaKucha talks — 20 images, 20 seconds per image, no clickers. We were lucky to hear from the following great minds:

There was a lovely gift to attendees flickering around the lobby and dining areas: Holey Cylinder 3D printing votive candles designed by Christopher Hanusa, aka Math Art Shop, and printed at Duke’s CoLab Studio…

And now, after a 16-hour day of learning, sharing, and networking, I’m officially tired and closing my laptop for the night.

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