Tag Archives: engineering

Here are photos and videos from yesterday’s @RoboExpoNYC. I love our annual celebration of creativity, ingenuity, perseverance, engineering, coding, and robots! #MakerEd #STEAM

Thank you to Hewitt School for hosting this year’s 14th annual Robo Expo yesterday! Many thanks to Erik Nauman and Jeremy Sambuca of Hewitt School, Hope Chafiian of Spence School, Michael Tempel of Logo Foundation, Lan Heng of Ethical Culture Fieldston School, Francesca Zammarano and Javier Alvez of United Nations International School, and Jane Moore (and me) for organizing again. Our event is a celebration of robotics, engineering, programming, physical computing, creativity, ingenuity, and perseverance. It’s a low-key, kid friendly, family-friendly, and age-appropriate afternoon, and I’m fiercely proud to be a part of the founding team since our first Robo Expo in 2005. 🙂

After completing a challenge, participants get robot stickers! This year’s challenges included:

You can view our tweets at @RoboExpoNYC. Here are images and videos below:

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Kinda fascinated by @worrydream’s video about how “seeing spaces” are the next “maker spaces” (via @fredbartels)

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

MIT-K12: Making Video to Make a Difference

Screen_shot_2012-03-28_at_2

http://k12videos.mit.edu

In December, 2011, Ian Waitz, MIT’s Dean of Engineering, launched the MIT-K12 project, driven by a series of questions: How can we change the perception of the role of engineers and scientists in the world? What can MIT do, right now, to improve STEM education at the K12 level? What if MIT became a publicly accessible “experiential partner” to the country’s K12 educators? What if MIT students generated short-form videos to complement the work those educators are already doing in their classrooms and homes?

This site was built around a simple idea: K12 educators and MIT should be working together to make movies. No one would argue that STEM education in the U.S. is in tough shape. Teachers want to do something about it, and so do MIT students.

Well, here’s your chance.

1. Educators can submit ideas for experiments or demonstrations they would like to see an MIT student perform and explain in a short video (5-10 minutes long) that will be made available online.

2. MIT students can then “check out” these assignments (in the library sense of that phrase) — or they can come up with their own ideas and check them out themselves.

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized