Tag Archives: Flickr

Slides from “Our Blogs, Ourselves” at the inaugural #SpringBlogFest

Dr. Nellie Deutsch (@nelliemuller) is busier than I am. That’s saying a lot. She invited me to present at the inaugural Spring Blog Festival that she co-organized with Sylvia Guinan (@ESLbrain) and Shelly Sanchez Terrell (@ShellTerrell). I titled my presentation Our Blogs, Ourselves, because I’m a child of the 70s and a sucker for a pun.

Curation is a 21st Century skill, and I have been curating my digital presence for years. I encourage people all the time to claim their virtual real estate even if they won’t be using it actively. My goal for this session is to share how and why I gather archival evidence of my professional endeavors and classroom projects in a digital portfolio and offer some tips to get started. Also, in the spirit of using social media socially, I will suggest ways to build and optimize a Personalized Learning Network (PLN).

The Spring Blog Festival will all be held online on WizIQ. The link for my session is here: http://www.wiziq.com/online-class/1680258-sbf-our-blogs-ourselves

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With a bullhorn and a dream, anything is possible. Final photo from #FieldDay at @The_School.

Field Day June 7, 2013

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Really liking how @RebelMouse gathers stuff from multiple sites into a “social front page”

(Follow me on RebelMouse by clicking the image above.)

Below is an explanation about RebelMouse from their website:

What is RebelMouse?

RebelMouse is based on the idea that people are proud of what they share on social networks, but are starting to feel embarrassed about their websites. RebelMouse creates your social front page, building a dynamic site around what you share.

But you don’t have to take our word for it; check out these articles by amazing writers:

By Sarah Lacy of Pando Daily
By Allyson Shontell of Business Insider

We’ve also been using our own RebelMouse to help us collect press like the above and provide updates that will help users better understand RebelMouse and how they can get the most out of it 🙂

But another way to say think about this is: What if you could build an awesome, social-first blog without spending on developers and designers and losing hours on your own efforts?

What if you could be active and engaging on Twitter and Facebook, and just because of that have an incredible site too?

What if you could also mix in your original content, creating blog posts, slideshows, and galleries on RebelMouse, complete with links that support your thesis (either personal or for your business or passion)?

Making this simple, effortless, and beautiful is our mission at RebelMouse.

Best,
Paul

P.S. Please email us to give feedback, or find us on Twitter or Facebook.

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A teachable moment after The @VillageVoice used my @Flickr photo despite my chosen @CreativeCommons license

Nopantsvillagevoice

Last week, a Flickr contact of mine congratulated me on having one of my photos printed in The Village Voice. I had no idea what he was talking about. He said it was one from my No Pants Subway Ride series. [More information about the No Pants Subway Ride, dreamed up by Charlie Todd and Improv Everywhere, is on their official blog post describing their event.]

My friend was sorting his recycling, and in the process of gathering his newspapers, he happened to skim the January 4-10, 2012 issue of The Village Voice and recognize my photo and my name. It’s all so incredibly serendipitous. When I got my hands on his issue and saw my photo in print, I was delighted with the half-page size, their treatment of it, and my (albeit teensy) byline, but I was sincerely shocked and confused.

Clearly, anything I post online is public. I’ve been telling my students to forget “public versus private” and instead consider “public versus less public.” It is comically easy to go online and copy/download/steal an image, a song, a movie, a book, etc. The hard part is to make wise choices and consistently cite sources or seek permission.

Here’s the thing: I license most of my photos on Flickr with Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial. So, that means I expect credit for my work and for others not to benefit financially for something I am offering freely. As The Village Voice charges for subscriptions and advertising, they are a commercial enterprise and use of my photo is clearly for commercial purposes.

I left a message John Dixon, Art Director of The Village Voice, saying that I appreciated the photo credit in the paper, but I was surprised no one contacted me or asked permission to use it. He wrote me the next day with a really nice apology, explaining that my chosen Creative Commons license “fell thru our quality-control cracks.” John offered standard compensation for a half-page re-use photo ($100) and to send extra hard-copies of the issue as it was no longer available at newsstands. I was amazed and gratified by John’s response, and my respect for Creative Commons grew. As per their About Page:

Our tools give everyone from individual creators to large companies and institutions a simple, standardized way to keep their copyright while allowing certain uses of their work — a “some rights reserved” approach to copyright — which makes their creative, educational, and scientific content instantly more compatible with the full potential of the internet. The combination of our tools and our users is a vast and growing digital commons, a pool of content that can be copied, distributed, edited, remixed, and built upon, all within the boundaries of copyright law. We’ve worked with copyright experts around the world to make sure our licenses are legally solid, globally applicable, and responsive to our users’ needs.

Original photo here: 

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