Tag Archives: Katie Hildebrandt

Grade 6 designing LEGOS with @Autodesk123D in math with @KKleinNYC. #mathchat #STEAM

Katie Klein (@KKleinNYC) and Jazmin Sherwood’s 6th grade math students are designing LEGOS in this third or fourth iteration of a project that we prototype and revamp each year. In the past, we’ve used a class account on Tinkercad to construct our 3-D shape, and this year students are working with Autodesk’s 123D Design (@Autodesk123D). Tinkercad is part of Autodesk’s 123D family of free apps for 3D scanning, designing, and slicing  apps and software.

In our math project, students solve for the surface area and volume of a one-bump LEGO. Time allowing, they also engineer either a larger traditionally shaped LEGO brick or design a LEGO that isn’t part of a set yet. We are ever grateful to Jeremy Sambuca of The Hewitt School for opening my eyes to this project years ago during a presentation at the now-closed Makerbot store in SoHo.

Here’s the updated lesson plan Katie shared with the children today:

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This classic intro from #TheSimpsons demonstrates the #PowersOfTen. #mathchat

Teaching decimals? Katie Klein and Jazmin Sherwood are in their 6th grade math classroom at The School at Columbia University. I shared with them one of my favorite intro clips from The Simpsons where the creators paid homage to the classic Powers of Ten video by Eames. Sometimes it helps to be the oldest person in the room…


Homer’s version


Eames version

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So glad so many teachers at @The_School are participating in @CSEdWeek’s #HourOfCode!

GoogleDoodle for Grace Hopper's 107th birthday
Today’s GoogleDoodle commemorates Grace Hopper’s 107th birthday, and this whole week (December 9-15, 2013) is designated as Computer Science Education Week. In order to get people, especially kids, interested in coding, Code.org and @CSEdWeek are imploring folks around the world to participate in an Hour of Code.

I received the following by email today:

Today, over 5 million students — in 25,000 classrooms, across 160 countries — will be first to experience the Hour of Code, to learn one hour of computer science through Code.org’s new learning platform, with video tutorials by Mark Zuckerberg, Chris Bosh and Bill Gates, or through other activities.

Try an Hour of Code now at http://hourofcode.com

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FC5FbmsH4fw

Code.org and all the partners behind Computer Science Education Week encourage students, parents, and educators worldwide to engage in computer science. This isn’t just about one hour. See new free curriculum or how to partner with Code.org to bring CS to your whole district at http://code.org/educate

Please join us in supporting this unprecedented event to make history for computer science. If you’re doing your own Hour of Code, share it with the world using #HourofCode.

There are great tutorials and activities on the Hour of Code site, so as a prequel to this week, Dylan Ryder and I organized a buddy activity on Friday afternoon to get older kids and younger kids to run through a command code scenario using scenes from Angry Birds and Plants vs. Zombies.(You can jump around the 20 different levels on the site here: http://learn.code.org/hoc/1) Many thanks to Kathryn Kaiser, Primary Division Principal, for helping us to coordinate with teachers and students from six different grades!

Hour Of Code

6th graders paired with 2nd graders, 5th graders paired with 1st Graders, and 4th graders paired with Kindergarteners. @DylanMRyder captured and tweeted a terrific image which was further retweeted by Code.org!

Girls love to program! #HourofCode kicks off @CSEdWeek early @The_School. 4th grdrs teach K buddies to code. #edtech pic.twitter.com/ebyEk7KvRC

— Dylan Ryder (@DylanMRyder) December 6, 2013

Later this week, middle school math teachers (Katie Reimer, Sabrina Goldberg, and Katie Hildebrandt) will be offering 6th, 7th, and 8th graders choice activities on Wednesday to further participate in the Hour of Code.

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Livescribe and Smartpens in Math for supporting notetaking/alternative assessments/flipped classroom model

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I met Ian Bryan (@sensiblecity) at TEDActive. We’d been Twitter contacts for a few months, and I’d attended TEDxDenverEd without fully appreciating his role or his work. (Note: Ian is now organizing TEDxPhiladelphiaEd, and I hope to attend on June 24th.)

On Sensible City’s website, they succinctly state their mission:

Our Work: To advance positive change by giving a powerful voice to the idea whose time has come.
Our Sweet Spot: Helping people converge and collaborate on transformative projects, products, institutions and ideas.

Ian recently introduced me to LiveScribe and the Smartpen. With Ian’s help, my school got hold of a few Echo Smartpens; I placed these in the hands of:

The Smartpen is like Polyvision’s Eno pen, only with ink. It has a camera at the tip and a microphone in the barrel, so it can simultaneously record everything the pen writes (in a special notebook) and all of the ambient audio. The recorded content is then uploaded to a computer using a cable, though the next version of the pen will be wireless. Additionally, all of your chicken scratches are synced to the audio, so you can later review your notes by scrolling anywhere on the audio’s play bar or anywhere on your writing. The Livescribe system encourages users to “write less and listen more.” Our model of pen is the 8GB Echo Smartpen, which can record up to 800 hours of audio.

David Bell posted a great CNET review of the Livescribe Echo Smartpen. In it, he wrote:

Ultimately, though, any worthwhile idea committed to paper in the digital era needs to find its way onto a computer. Notes get retyped, voice recordings transcribed, drawings scanned, and hours are lost to tedious analog-to-digital conversion.

With the paperless, human-computer singularity still a few decades off, the Echo smartpen has arrived to address the lingering analog/digital dilemma of capturing handwritten notes and voice memos in a convenient digital format.

My goal is for the teachers and the students to share responsibility for taking notes, solving problems, and posting these recordings (or pencasts) to a shared space. Also, students can be recorded verbalizing/demonstrating how they solve a problem, thus tracking their fluency with the language of mathematics and their own understanding of the learning. These pencasts can be assessed and added to the child’s portfolio. I also want the class (and/or our school) to generate a digital archive of pencasts that we can use to catch-up students who miss class for any reason, to empower kids to teach each other, to further the idea of using multiple methods for finding a solution, and to engage students in the learning process.

On the Livescribes site, you can access thousands of pencasts which reminds me of the astonishing collection of resources on the Khan Academy website. Thus, the classroom teacher can create a learning environment that embraces the flipped classroom model – encouraging students to learn at home at their own pace and free up classtime for more meaningful problem solving and projects with the teacher.

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