Tag Archives: MAKE Magazine

Pics from Day 1 of #Construct3D and @DukeU’s @InnovionCoLab Studio. #MakerEd #STEMed #STEAM

I’m at Duke University for the inaugural Construct3D conference sponsored by Duke, Ultimaker, Autodesk, and ShopBot! Many thanks to co-organizer, Liz Arum, for encouraging me to attend. Below is the description from their website:

Construct3D 2017 is a national conference on digital fabrication focused on “3D printing” for higher education,  K-12, and community education. Join us as we explore ways to foster student engagement, support research, and improve understanding using 21st century technology.

Construct3D 2017 aims to bring together educators from a broad range of educational contexts to exchange ideas and innovation — to accelerate adoption and exploration of 3D printingConstruct3D offers educational pioneers opportunities to shape the implementation of 3D printing in education in years to come.

After a walk and a biscuits and gravy lunch with Ian Klapper of City and Country School, we made our way to Duke’s Technology Engagement Center for workshops and a tour of the Innovation Co-Lab Studio by its director, Chip Bobbert. Photos of the Co-Lab‘s awesome space for digital fabrication are posted below. Check out the mesmerizing wall of Ultimaker printers as well as laser cutters, CNC mills, 3D jet printers, a vending machine of engineering tools, and other tools that make me happy including a vinyl cutter and sewing machine.

 

 

Pics from the opening reception with a keynote from Dale Dougherty of Make Magazine and early glimpses of the vendor tables are below:


Some videos from educator projects highlighted at Ultimaker’s table are below:​


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Pics from my lunch and walk with Ian are below:

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Building water rocket launchers with @bendickraikes in 6th science at @The_School

@BenedickRaikes is the 6th grade science teacher at The School at Columbia University and an extraordinary colleague. He was inspired to build water rocket launchers this semester. In preparation for that, he purchased a book, Make: Rockets, and a Water Rocket Launcher kit from Maker Shed. (Update: these kits do not seem to be currently available…)

After assembling the kit’s prototype, Ben felt much better about asking 6th graders to build their own water rocket launchers as well. We purchased all of the parts using the supplies list from the book (also on the DIY project website). Most of the materials came from Lowe’s, and this process was made substantially easier as the book includes all of the parts numbers. Other bits and bobs were sourced from Amazon and the neighborhood hardware store.

Ben and I thought it would be fun if the students were to “place an order” at Lowe’s for the materials, so we shared the shopping list with them. Students were tasked with filling out a spreadsheet in math class that included space for them to insert an image of each part and an area for them to tally the cost of the project. See below:

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This week, 6th graders assembled their water rocket launchers using plans from Make Magazine: http://makezine.com/projects/water-rocket-launcher Students were divided into 4 groups of about 4-5 students. Each group had a faculty mentor at their table — 6th Grade Math Teacher Catherine Hildebrandt (@KKleinNYC), Math Associate Jazmin Sherwood, Intermediate Division Principal Kevin Fittinghoff, and me — which left Ben to float from group to group offering help and guidance. We had to saw PVC and wood, join pieces with epoxy or PVC primer and cement, assemble materials, work with drills, screwdrivers, utility knives, pliers, clamps, and more.

After two days of constructing rocket launchers, students were asked to fill out a self-reflection feedback sheet with the following questions:

  1. Did you enjoy the rocket launcher building project? Give reasons.
  2. What was your favorite part of the project?
  3. What did you find difficult or challenging?
  4. Did you learn anything new doing this activity?
  5. What are your thoughts about working in a group of 4 or 5 children?
  6. Would you be interested in doing a project like this again? What would you chose to build? (Realistic suggestions only please!)

Tomorrow students will have a soft launch (pun intended!) of their rockets. On Monday, the grade will gather together in the park for the official launch and to compare results.

After seeing my tweet about our project, Chris Casal (@Mr_Casal) shared a link to a wonderful video highlighting the work of Christine Boyer (@5boyer) and her 5th graders who launched rockets last year. Christine also provided a wonderful documentation of the project here, and she recently presented her class’s work at the National Science Teachers Assocation‘s annual conference!

LIFTOFF TO LEARNING from Ralph King, Hawkview Pictures on Vimeo.

 

 

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Brief notes and tweets from the #NYCschoolsTech Summit this week. #edchat

I attended the School Technology Summit hosted by the NYC Department of Education this week. I love opportunities to gather with educators and learn about great ideas and “best practices in educational technology.” @JanePook introduced the event with a clip from Back to the Future Part Two, where the gang is traveling from 1985 into the distant future of October 21, 2015.

Chancellor Carmen Fariña made an appearance much to the delight of the large crowd of almost 2000 teachers and administrators. She implored teachers to be the leaders in their schools and share with their students their joy in learning. She spoke about how she considers herself a digital immigrant but is always trying to learn, be it 3D printing or programming in Scratch. She talked about how she believes the Maker Movement will change schools and that, as always, she is looking towards funding schools appropriately to keep them current and wifi-enabled.

The keynote for the event was Dale Dougherty @dalepd, founder of @Make Magazine and co-creator of @MakerFaire. Dale further drove home the importance of STEM, STEAM, and the Maker Movement. He talked about how Make Magazine is the modern day Popular Mechanics, and his purpose in creating it was to offer How-To guides so technology can be as open & accessible as cooking. Dale also suggested that he thinks there is a real possibility of some sort of Tactile Deficit Syndrome that may one day be diagnosed in children if they only touch glass screens. Dale shared his New Rules of Making: 1. Open over Proprietary 2. Individual over Institution 3. Collaborative over Competitive 4. Practice over Theory. He also shared links to the MakerEd.org website and the Makerspace Playbook. Finally, Dale promised a backstage tour of the Maker Faire for teachers. Fingers crossed that happens!

I attended a panel organized by Lisa Neilsen (@InnovativeEdu) and moderated by Tali Horowitz of @CommonSense Media entitled, “So You Lifted the Cell Phone Ban, Now What?” Teachers and principals talked about their experiences in Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) and/or One to One (One device per student or “1:1”) environments. Lisa shared a great document with tons of resources: http://tinyurl.com/STS15-Panel-They-Lifted

I also attended a session called, “Wonders of the NYC Tech World” where 6 school tech teachers and leaders shared their routines, projects, students, successes, and challenges. Links to their slide presentations are here: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1oV1_vn1cY-aZAWlufKS_aa-Z6g8co5SsFtFFpIE7ySM/htmlview

Manhattan Borough President, @GaleABrewer, was present for the final ceremony where she handed out awards for Excellence in School Technology. So many public school teachers were recognized for their achievements, but only @AharonSchultz pulled out a selfie stick and took a photo with Gale on stage!

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