Tag Archives: makered

Thanks to @___pi for sharing a link to #Paperbits with @microbit_edu! Currently prototyping with @kstark013 and two #MakerCamp girls. #scichat #STEAM #STEMed #MakerEd #elemaker @BrearleyNYC

On Monday, I saw that Sylvia Martinez retweeted something from Per-Ivar Kloen about Paperbits:

Per-Ivar is a Fab Learn Fellow, and he graciously also shared with me a direct link to the the paper which describes his Paperbits (Paper Circuits with Microbits) project inspiration and process: http://fellows.fablearn.org/circuit-stickers-electronic-circuits-made-of-copper-tape/

I shared this link with Kasie Stark, one of the fabulous Science teachers at The Brearley School. Kasie is leading a MakerLab session during Brearley’s Summer Start program, and she suggested trying out Paperbits with her campers this week. On Monday, Kasie and I met to chat about micro:bits  and MakeCode (micro:bit’s JavaScript Blocks editor). We gathered copper tape, LED lights, alligator clips, and Piezo buzzers, and a few copies of Per-Ivar’s Paperbits lessons.

Today, I met Kasie and her campers and we explored together. The girls are both going into 4th grader and have had experiences with littleBits, LEGO WeDo, Scratch, JavaScript, and more. I love working with smart, fearless girls! We treated  Per-Ivar’s Paperbits PDF’s as a fun starting point, and then the girls further prototyped with different sequences of blinking lights and different tunes from the buzzers.  See images and videos below.

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Check out @Tinkercad’s toolbar addition of #Scribble!

Check out Tinkercad‘s toolbar addition of Scribble! Here’s a link to their blog post with more information about Scribble:
https://blog.tinkercad.com/2018/04/26/introducing-scribble-the-ultimate-tinkercad-personalization-tool/

I love the freedom of hand-drawing! If there were a Tinkercad iPad app, I could see using this for next year’s Class II Lenape buzzer toy project. On the iPad, Morphi or Doodle3D are options for finger-sketching designs.

I imagine Scribble may include more features eventually, like maybe a “fill” option? Without a quick way to fill an outline of a shape, I manually used the Brush Tool (as if I were drawing with crayons on paper), and then use the Eraser Tool to make the holes in my first design below. For my second attempt, I used the Shape Tool and Shape Eraser Tool. It was a little weird at first, but then I started to get the hang of it. I’d really like the option of sketching an outline and filling it in. Yes, I’m repeating myself.Screen Shot 2018-04-27 at 9.38.06 AM.pngscreen-shot-2018-04-27-at-10-13-46-am.png

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Making cardboard, #FunkeyFunkey, and @Scratch slot machines starring @brearleynyc’s class mascots for our upcoming Casino Night. #MakerEd #STEAM

Before Thursday’s Upper School performance of Guys and Dolls at The Brearley School, there will be a Supper Club Casino Night for the community with games led by faculty. I offered to help, though I was worried about being responsible for learning and facilitating Poker or Blackjack, so I offered to make some slot machines.

I figured there must be a bunch of programs shared by the awesome Scratch-user community, and they didn’t disappoint. I remixed this project generously offered by Jcg127: https://scratch.mit.edu/projects/23156262/#player

I removed the Yay! and Jackpot! procedures and swapped in nine new costumes representing Brearley’s class mascots (camel, penguin, tiger, owl, duck, buffalo, elephant, bear) and the official school mascot (beaver).  I then found some cardboard in the recycle bin and built some quick yet sturdy casings for three separate laptops.

I knew I’d use some of our FunkeyFunkey boards for the project and was originally considering a physical lever with a tilt sensor. I imagined having a hinge or printing 3D pieces (similar to Makedo parts) to hold a long cardboard tube in place (I have a stockpile of cardboard tubes from wrapping paper rolls). A rubber-band stretched somewhere would allow the lever to pull forward yet return upright for its home position, and the tilt sensor inside the tube would recognize when the arm was lowered and “spin” the rollers in my slot machine.

However, I had four hours today to generate the Scratch program and mock up the cardboard cases, so I used our FunkeyFunkey arcade buttons instead. They are build like a nut and bolt, and they sandwich cardboard beautifully. Easy peasy! Also, Stephen Lewis (creator of the FunkeyFunkey) designed his sensors (tilt, touch, button, infrared, etc.) to work even without being grounded, so they are so much easier to incorporate into projects.

If I had more time, I’d definitely make my slot machines more attractive. These definitely look homemade. 🙂 Here’s a tutorial for a DIY slot machine I belatedly found: http://www.instructables.com/id/HOW-TO-MAKE-SLOT-MACHINE-DIY/

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized