Tag Archives: online

Maker Camp

The inaugural Maker Camp will happen online on Make’s Google+ page from July 16 – August 24.

There will be 30 different activities shared over the 6-week program. Anyone can attend for free using their Google+ account.

Adults should register here for a free promotional kit and one issue of MAKE magazine here: http://makercamp-eorg.eventbrite.com/

Teens should register here for the program: http://makercampteenprogram.eventbrite.com/

Details from the registration site below:

Introducing Maker Camp on Google+
Now every teen can experience summer camp because it’s online and it’s free! Maker Camp is a virtual summer camp on Google+, teaching campers how to make 30 awesome projects in 30 days.

How it Works
Maker Camp is a virtual summer camp for teens, with a focus on creating, building, and DIY-ing. It’s free and open to all, and runs from July 16th through August 24th.

Each weekday morning, a new project will be introduced by an expert camp counselor who will walk campers through the steps to build the project. Materials lists will be posted in advance so campers have time to find supplies for the next day’s project.

Each afternoon, campers can join the camp counselor in a Hangout on Google+ to talk about the project and look at photos campers have submitted.

And tune in every Friday, when we’ll be taking campers on epic “field trips” via a G+ Hangout!

Mark your calendar for Maker Camp on Google+ today! Camp starts July 16th!

How to Join In
Maker Camp is all about interactivity and participation! Be ready for the first day of Maker Camp by building your profile on G+ today and adding MAKE to your circles. Once you’re on G+, you can interact with friends and other campers and follow along with Maker Camp’s daily projects. Then show off your creations with photos and videos!

For more information visit makezine.com/go/makercamp

If you have any questions at all, please contact Meg Mason at mmason@makezine.com

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Talking with kids about Facebook privacy controls. Knowing is half the battle.

Jay Heath (@heathjw), a Technical Support Specialist at Ethical Culture Fieldston School, sent a message to the NYCIST listserv about teaching teens to navigate online privacy settings. He was seeking more resources, beyond the following sites:

The responses to his query were super informative and worth sharing so I gathered them below.

Karyn Silverman, High School Librarian and Educational Technology Department Chair at Little Red School House and Elisabeth Irwin High School (LREI) shared an awesome animated graphic of the evolution of Facebook default privacy controls created by Matt McKeon. Also of interest is Matt’s post about usage of this chart online and in print. (The direct link is here: http://www.mattmckeon.com/facebook-privacy/)

Karyn also shared the following articles that she discusses with her high school students:

Arvind Grover (@arvind) is currently the Director of Technology at The Hewitt School and will be an amazing administrator at Grace Church School next year. Arvind said he uses Mashable’s guide to Facebook privacy with his students.

Pat Hough (@PatHough) is the Lower School Technology Coordinator at Columbia Grammar and Preparatory School. She shared a link to Danah Boyd‘s (@zephoria) keynote from the Theorizing the Web conference last month: http://thesocietypages.org/cyborgology/2011/04/11/audio-from-danah-boyds-ttw2011-keynote/

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Publicly learning my lesson about properly using digital images from Artstor.org

As per my last post, I just finished a Renaissance Photoshop art project with 6th graders where we located digital images of Renaissance paintings from ARTstor‘s online digital gallery and then used Photoshop to layer themselves into the painting. During the course of the 3-day project, we had discussions about copyright, fair use, and public domain. We talked about how the Mona Lisa and all the other works we were altering are in the public domain, and our contributions to the original paintings were copyrightable.

I said that there were two possible hiccups preventing us from going forth and copyrighting our art: Our digital images of the paintings came from http://ARTstor.org, and the hardware/software we used is owned by Columbia University. Because I hate being ignorant and I love being right, I contacted ARTstor to find out if we could convince ourselves that we owned our altered image. I spoke to Cassy Juhl, a User Services Associate, who conferred with ARTstor’s lawyers and emailed me a few days later. Essentially, we can access/view/use images from ARTstor for academic and non-commercial purposes because Columbia University subscribes to their service. However, since ARTstor does not own the images in their digital collection, they can’t authorize manipulation of the files. I reminded the kids that ignorance is a terrible excuse for doing something unethical; Since we now know that we can’t use ARTstor’s images for this project, we cannot further ignore and abuse their Terms and Conditions of Use.

So, my latest idea is to generate our own collection of digital images of works of art at The School at Columbia University. Tons of museums allow no-flash photography, so I (or my students) can just gather our own photos of public domain art that we can then freely alter. As per the Mona Lisa, I’ll either have to elbow through the throngs of tourists at The Louvre this summer to take the best possible photo of her or establish a contact that can offer us a fair use copy.

Below is Cassy’s response that I shared with my 6th graders:

Dear Karen,
Thank you for your phone call.  After looking into your question regarding ownership of an altered image and I have a response for you. The ARTstor Terms and Conditions of Use ( http://www.artstor.org/our-organization/o-pdf/terms-conditions.pdf ) prohibit the modification of ARTstor images.
Specifically, see Section 6:

Prohibited Uses. You may not: (a) use the ARTstor Digital Library, or use, display or make performances with, reproduce, or distribute Content from the ARTstor Digital Library, for any commercial purpose whatsoever, including but not limited to fee-for-service use of the ARTstor Digital Library, or make any use, display, performance, reproduction, or distribution that exceeds or violates these Terms and Conditions of Use; (b) distribute and/or make available Content in the ARTstor Digital Library to persons other than as expressly permitted herein; (c) provide and/or authorize access to the ARTstor electronic database, such as through the sharing of passwords, to persons or entities other than Authorized Users; (d) download or print, or attempt to download or print, substantial portions of the ARTstor Digital Library; (e) incorporate Content into print or electronic materials that are for purchase or are disseminated for commercial purposes (such as by a scholarly or commercial press); (f) use (including reproduce, distribute, display or make performances of) the ARTstor Digital Library in any way that is not authorized under this Agreement and that infringes another’s Intellectual Property Rights therein; (g) make any adaptation or modification of, or any derivative work from, Content; or (h) attempt to override, circumvent, or disable any encryption features or software protections employed in the ARTstor Digital Library.

ARTstor does not own any of the images in the Digital Library and as such we are unable to broker rights for said images.  We are only able to offer high quality images because our contributors provide images to be used for the very specific uses outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Use.
Please feel free to contact us with any further questions or concerns.
Kind regards,
Cassy Juhl
___________________________________________
Cassy Juhl
User Services Associate
ARTstor

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Who are the people in your [online] neighborhood? After TEDActive, @kristinalford is one of them.

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While I engaged with a variety of smart, interesting, motivated, and passionate people at TEDActive, the first person I met was Kristin Alford (@kristinalford). After a sleepless night and a long trans-continental flight, I blearily arrived at the Riviera in Palm Springs, checked into the hotel on Foursqare (I could not check-in physically as my room wasn’t ready), and was delighted that the app yielded a half-price Shiraz at the Sidebar Lounge!

I am genetically inclined towards bargain shopping and talking to strangers, so I immediately told the nearest person about the wine deal. Kristin, too, was waiting for her room to be ready, so we made quick work of introducing ourselves, deciding that wine was indeed in order, and situating ourselves at the Sidebar.

We had a delightful couple of hours (and glasses) together, and it was a pleasure to meetup throughout our time together at TEDActive. Kristin described herself as futurist; She is the Founder and Managing Director of Bridge8, which is “a foresight, industry development and science communications consultancy based in Australia.” (I was slightly disappointed that being a futurist didn’t mean psychic powers and the ability to predict lottery numbers…)

Kristin was also the lead of the TEDActiveSOC action project. Here are some excerpts from her blog post describing the project:

Last week, I had the privilege of attending TEDActive, the livestreamed sister of conference of TED. Amidst the talks, the conversations and the workshops for TEDx organisers, I participated in one of the TEDActive projects – Social Networks (or #TEDActiveSOC). The purpose of our project was explore how we might use our social networks to turn inspiration into action.

As the discussion unfolds, we realise we have surfaced a number of questions to explore with the wider TEDActive audience. These questions are:

  • How might you find what matters to you through your social networks?
  • How do you discover what you can do about the thing(s) that matter to you?
  • How might you tip inspiration into action?How might we tackle big things with human-sized action?
  • How might we you nurture your social aura (effectivess, reputation)?
  • How might social networks make you more courageous?
  • How might you move from tweet to street?

Rather than proposing a specific micro action, we are proposing a new micro philosophy. Know the power of the people in your network, know the way to reach them, and know to ask them to act in a way that matters. Whether it’s showing support for the middle east, participating in JR’s global art project, or spreading TEDED we’re asking you to be deliberate in your social networks. When you share your ideas from this week, we’re asking you to be the signal, not the noise.

Kristin talked about embracing “not micro-actions but a micro-philosophy,” and she quotes Amanda Rose’s interview on TEDActiveSOC in the Huffington Post:

  1. Be yourself. People will respond best to those with an authentic social media voice.
  2. Listen and give back to your community. Others will remember your contribution.
  3. Chose the right social media channel for your message. Consider the audience.
  4. Clearly define what it is you are asking. The more specific, the better result.
  5. Be passionate. Show people how they can be part of something bigger.
  6. Report back. People want to feel valued and hear about the impact or results.

Finally, I love Kristin’s last paragraph: The outcome of the TEDActiveSOC project is to ask you take on this micro-philosophy of using your networks more deliberately to create change that matters.

That is an idea worth spreading, for sure.

[image: (from http://galleries.thedigitalphotobooth.com/CORPORATE-EVENTS/TED-Active/1602814…)]

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