Tag Archives: parallel circuits

Fun with sewable circuits, Class 5, and @PietroEnnis at @BrearleyNYC #STEAM #MakerEd #elemaker


@PietroEnnis and I are wrapping up a Class 5 project on sewable circuits. These Brearley girls are so fun to work with! They are creative, funny, inquisitive, and passionate about whatever they set their mind to. For this project (which correlated with a study of electricity in Science class), students were tasked with creating a circuit using conductive thread, as many as 5 LEDs, a coin cell battery, and some sort of means of powering their circuit (a battery pocket or a LilyPad battery holder with switch). Projects included dog collars, wrist cuffs, neck ties, donuts, animals, ice cream cones, and a skateboarding taco.

Before anyone began threading needles or cutting felt, everyone was asked to draw a template of their project (to scale) on paper. This sketch included the location of the battery pack, location of any lights, and distinct paths for the conductive thread in order to connect the negative “legs” of the lights and the positive “legs” of the lights.

While I’ve used YouTube videos and various resources in the past to help students review how to sew a parallel circuit, this time I brought Jaymes Dec and Ji Sun Lee’s book to class. Make: Tech DIY has great project ideas, lovely photos, and clear instructions. I love supporting my friends!

Make: Tech DIY

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Photos from a magical #MakerDay at @mouse_org! #STEAM #STEM #MakerEd #KidsCanCode

Mouse is an which organization strives to “empower all students to create with technology to solve real problems and make meaningful change in our world. Additionally, they are “committed to creating more diversity in STEM and opening opportunities for students from underserved communities across the country.” (via their website)

I was lucky enough to attend Maker Day on November 19th — these Maker Days happen twice a year and are a family-friendly celebration of creativity, problem solving, problem finding, prototyping, and making open to middle and high school students.

Maker Day gives you twice the time as our regular Maker Night to spend creating alongside professionals. More time so you can dig deep into coding, 3D design, or crafting something to take home. It’s a great experience to get your hands dirty with technology for an afternoon and get creative. A perfect day trip for a tech club, Maker Day will feature activities from content on create.mouse.org and more.

At the event, there were many different stations of activities peppered around their space. Upon entering, one could assemble and decorate a Google Cardboard VR headset.img_0635

Another station encouraged attendees to construct a DIY Operation game out of cardboard, tin foil, LED light, wire, and a coin cell battery.

I spend a lot of time at an activity chatting with Deren Gruler of Teknikio. She and some volunteers helped attendees create a light-up superhero cuff that could test for conductivity — if you close the circuit with an object and the LED lights up, then the objective is conductive!

There were additional stations set up to explore wind power, coding, MakeyMakey video games, Arduino circuits, breadboarding, and more.

I also spent some time reading the inspiring words and Mouse mission statements printed on the walls…

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Shared notes from “Intro to Sewable Circuits” at @Teach21c. #MakerEd

I’m leading a Teach21 professional development workshop this morning, Introduction to Sewable Circuits. Here’s the description for the morning plan:
Let us explore the A in STEAM by designing sewable (and wearable) circuits! By adding the Arts to traditional STEM goals, (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics), we can embrace design, creativity, and integration. Let’s discuss interdisciplinary possibilities while creating a light-up wristband using a coin cell battery, conductive thread, and LEDs.

Click here to go directly to the webpage of shared notes or see the embedded document below:

 

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5th grade hacks Greek constellations in a circuitry project. @The_School #scichat #artsed #5thchat

I have enjoyed spending the last ten years  collaborating with intelligent, creative, and willing colleagues at The School at Columbia University. Though I mainly worked with middle school teachers and students, I was often asked for help, guidance, or partnership from teachers in  the other grades. I always assisted anyone (parents, teachers, students) which helped me build community, connect people and ideas to each other as a de facto curriculum coordinator, hone my craft, and simply share all the stuff I’ve gathered and learned from my amazing network and the ideas being shared via Twitter, meet ups, conferences, workshops, and casual conversations.

Yoshiko Maruiwa is one of my favorite colleagues. After hearing I was leaving The School next year to join The Brearley School as their inaugural K-12 Technology Coordinator, Yoshiko asked if we could do one final project together in her 5th grade Art classes. I knew the students had recently completed an electronics and circuitry unit in science with Monique Rothman, and they’d studied Ancient Greece in Social Studies (including participating in a grade-wide Olympics). So, it wasn’t a big stretch to imagine having the 5th graders use the existing stars of Greek constellations to re-conceptualize their designs. I had originally intended for LED lights to be connected via wires that students would cut to size and connect into parallel circuits, but there wasn’t enough time. Instead, we used a lot of expensive copper tape.

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